What Can You Learn by Visiting Your IT Consulting Provider’s Office in Los Angeles?

What Can You Learn by Visiting Your IT Consulting Provider’s Office in Los Angeles?

Choosing The Right IT Company

You've kind of got to look at IT consulting in Los Angeles in a deductive way. There are numerous little clues which can help you parse through exaggeration or diminished emphasis. One of the most telling has to do with office space. Primarily: is there an office? And if there is, what kind of office is it? Is it a room in a basement outfitted with several servers, computers, and computer equipment? Or is it an actual office at a location either owned or rented by the company in question?

A one-man show may be able to help several clients very well, but if their services have any merit, they'll have clientele increase which predicates more than a single employee. There are only twenty-four hours in a day, and only so much one person can do for a client -- or multiple clients -- in that time. You need support requisite to your systems. While such support may be primarily sustainable for a single individual, during emergencies this will not be the case.

So look at the office of the IT group in question. It should be professional, it should be extensive, it should be organized and aesthetically pleasing to the eye. The spirit behind a small startup pulling itself up by its bootstraps is commendable, but let them cut their teeth on smaller clients whose emergencies can be sustained by a single person, or a handful of them. For professional needs that may incorporate substantial assets, you need an IT group that can carry the load.

Other Signs

IT consulting in Los Angeles will be properly defined by a number of additional factors:

  • Cost-free walkthrough and initial proposal
  • A history of satisfied clients
  • Cutting-edge cloud solutions
  • Multiple service locations
  • Proactive technical support

Look for an on-site walkthrough and initial proposal that is free. An IT group that doesn't have a good business model won't be able to offer this; they'll have to charge for initial consultation. This is a sign their services aren't going to be requisite to your needs. But if their services are worthwhile, they'll not only have free consultation, but a history of satisfied clients.

One of the most satisfying aspects of modern IT involves tech solutions that are on the cutting edge of technical development. Right now, cloud computing is changing the business atmosphere, and so you should expect provisions in this field that are competitive.

To retain a competitive and secure support model, you should also expect more than a single service location. Especially in Los Angeles, a city on wheels that stretches 503 square miles in all directions, you're going to need more than a single service center to properly support your operation comprehensively, dependably, and in a timely manner. Lastly, tech support must be proactive. This will keep the largest technical difficulties from undercutting your operations, and is only something available from a more established tech group.

A Company That Is Making Waves

IT consulting in Los Angeles is a game that brings companies in contact with some of the country's most high-profile clients. At DCG Technical Solutions, Inc., we've steadily risen in technical acumen and effectivity such that we can boast multiple service locations, proactive support, cutting edge cloud solutions, regularly satisfied clients, and a cost-free analysis of your needs.


About Brent Whitfield

Brent Whitfield is CEO of DCG Technical Solutions, Inc., which provides IT Support in the Los Angeles area since 1993. DCG exists to help our clients choose, implement, and manage IT and cloud solutions that are cost effective and reliable. DCG's pro-active approach to IT is ideally suited for companies who depend on reliable IT infrastructure, but don't want to spend a lot of money to keep it that way. DCG was recognized among the Top 10 Fastest Growing MSPs in North America by MSP Mentor. Brent has been featured in Fast Company, CNBC, Network Computing, Reuters, and Yahoo Business.