Meltdown and Spectre fixes cause problems

Meltdown and Spectre fixes cause problems

It’s been three weeks since one of the worst IT security vulnerabilities in history was announced, and consumers are still receiving mixed messages about how to protect themselves. We usually encourage users to install software updates as often as possible, but when it comes to Meltdown and Spectre, that advice comes with an asterisk.

Think before saving logins to your browser

Think before saving logins to your browser

There are a number of reasons you should be wary of saving your password to a digital platform. Just look at Yahoo’s data breach in 2013, which leaked passwords for three billion people. Even when your password isn’t compromised, saving it to a browser could have serious implications for your privacy.

Phishers use encrypted sites to scam

Phishers use encrypted sites to scam

Just when you thought cyber criminals couldn’t get smarter, along comes a new scamming technique. Previously used for safeguarding browsing activity, encryption tools are now used by hackers in carrying out phishing scams. This means some fraudulent sites may have HTTPS on their address, giving users a false sense of security.

Cybersecurity Essentials: VPN

Cybersecurity Essentials: VPN

Whether it’s because of government surveillance or cyberattacks, internet users are more concerned than ever about the privacy of their online activities. Unfortunately, security measures like firewalls and antivirus software can’t help you in this case, but there’s one that can: Virtual Private Network (VPN).

What is VPN?

Simply put, a VPN is a group of servers you connect to via the internet.

KRACK hacks: What you need to know

KRACK hacks: What you need to know

You’ve heard of ransomware, denial-of-service attacks, and even phishing, but one hacking technique you may not have heard of is the KRACK exploit. This attack takes advantage of a vulnerability in WiFi networks, which puts any device with a wireless connection at risk.

Re-secure your passwords!

Re-secure your passwords!

In 2003, a manager at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) authored a document on password best practices for businesses, federal agencies, and academic institutions. Now retired, the author admits that his document was misguided.